More sports in brief

first_imgSamuels fined KOLKATA, India (CMC): West Indies batsman Marlon Samuels has been fined 30 per cent of his match fee following a verbal altercation with England all-rounder Ben Stokes during Sunday’s final of the T20 World Cup. Samuels, who was adjudged the Man of the Match for his unbeaten 66-ball 85, was accused of using abusive and offensive language directed at Stokes, a Level One breach. He was found to be in violation of Article 2.1.4 of the ICC Code of Conduct for Players and Player Support Personnel, which relates to “using language or a gesture that is obscene, offensive or insulting during an International Match”. Samuels has admitted the offence and accepted the sanction proposed by Ranjan Madugalle of the Emirates Elite Panel of ICC Match Referees. Level One breaches normally carry a minimum penalty of an official reprimand and a maximum penalty of 50 per cent of a player’s match fee. Four WI cricketers in ICC teams KOLKATA, India (CMC): Four West Indies cricketers have been included on the ICC teams of the tournament following the T20 World Cup which ended here on Sunday. Stafanie Taylor has been appointed captain of the women’s team, which also includes her teammate all-rounder Deandra Dottin. The West Indies women captain, who was awarded player of the tournament, has been placed at the helm of a line-up that also comprises four players from New Zealand, two players each from Australia and England, and one player each from Pakistan and South Africa. Spinner Samuel Badree and all-rounder Andre Russell are the two West Indies players in the male line-up led by India’s Virat Kohli, player of the tournament. An ICC statement says the teams were chosen by a select group of former cricket stars and commentators who were given the task of picking a balanced side for all conditions on the basis of performances in the tournament.last_img read more

‘MoBay City Run could be a catalyst for major sports tourism drive’

first_imgWestern Bureau:In addition to being the tourist capital of Jamaica, Montego Bay, through its MoBay City Run, coupled with the plethora of some of the best golf courses in the Caribbean, could become a major pull for travellers seeking high-end sports and wellness activities.The idea was pitched at yesterday’s press briefing for the May 1 MoBay City Run by Dr Horace Chang, in whose North West St James constituency the event has been located since inception.”The entire community has begun looking at the City Run as a calendar event for Montego Bay and I want to commend the organisers and those who originated the idea, as it brings out not only the support for higher education, but also brings the city together,” said Chang.”In addition to that, it could well become another event to attract a high volume of our visitors, as we are still the resort capital of Jamaica and indeed the Caribbean,” he added.UNIQUE POSITIONThe run, he said, could easily become part of the international 10K/5K calendar and with the large number of golf courses and available tennis courts, Montego Bay is uniquely positioned to benefit from the lucrative sports tourism market.He said the city has the required infrastructure to facilitate tourists in large numbers.This year’s event will also celebrate the establishing of Montego Bay’s city status 35 years ago.Montego Bay Mayor Glendon Harris told The Gleaner that the City Run will highlight the best of Montego Bay, acting as a unifying force in a city that struggles at times to maintain its good name.Both Chang and Harris were participants in the inaugural staging of MoBay City Run in 2014 and have used their respective offices and status within the city to endorse the event, which pulled well in excess of 2,000 participants last year.The event has raised more than $6.5 million in its two years, while supporting education with valuable scholarships to more than 200 students at the tertiary level so far, and organisers are hoping to double the recipients’ pool this year.Entry Fee: Groups – 20 or more – $1,500 per person; individuals – $2,000 (Early Bird Special), which ends on April 15.After April 15, the registration cost will increase by $500 per category (group or individual).Janet Silvera, chairman of the MoBay City Run Organising Committee, revealed that registration has been going well and that they have surpassed 1,500 registered participants at this early stage.last_img read more

CUMI Come Run inks million-dollar deal with Wisynco

first_imgWESTERN BUREAU: The 2015 staging of the CUMI (Committee for the Upliftment of the Mentally Ill) Come Run 5K and 10K Road races is set to attract its biggest number of participants in the seven years since its inception, with early projections pointing to more than 800 athletes. The disclosure was made at the event’s press launch at Pier One in Montego Bay on Thursday, along with news that local conglomerate, Wisynco Group Limited, has joined forces with CUMI as title sponsor to the tune of one million dollars. Wisynco Group regional manager, Vivian Newman, told The Gleaner the move was a strategic one, which will serve to help place mental health issues at the forefront of national issues needing special attention. “The work that CUMI is undertaking is a critical one which serves to uplift the nation. We at Wisynco therefore thought it best to join forces with them in order to keep the light shining on this very important issue of mental health,” said Newman. “We hope to have a long and beneficial association with CUMI as we strive to play our part in Jamaica’s development,” Newman added. CUMI Come Run will once again take place at the picturesque Tryall Golf Club in Hanover on September 19, starting with pre-race warm-up session at 6 a.m., before the actual races at 7 a.m. The course will take runners and walkers around and over the challenging course, which includes two hill climbs, making it one of the most challenging 5K courses in the island. Four hydration stops are also included. Track events managers, Running Events, will be on board for another year, while some of the usual sponsors Xerox, Sandals Foundation, National Health Fund (NHF), the CPJ, Rainforest Seafoods, Solo Jamaica, JMMB and Fontana Pharmacy have all returned. All proceeds from the event will go towards providing the necessary medical and other needs of mentally ill and mentally challenged persons in Montego Bay and throughout western Jamaica.last_img read more

Bolt to conquer Beijing again – Mills

first_imgNEW YORK (CMC):Usain Bolt’s coach, Glen Mills, has backed the superstar to come good at this month’s World Championships in Beijing.The 28-year-old Bolt will enter the August 22-30 showpiece at the Bird’s Nest Stadium with question marks over his form, after a series of lacklustre performances in recent months.However, Mills said while Bolt had suffered several injury setbacks recently which had affected his preparation, he was the type of athlete who was always highly motivated for the major championships.”The last two years have been very challenging for both Usain and myself,” Mills was quoted as saying.”Unfortunately, he has had a number of different injuries to overcome which have affected his training and the number of competitions he has been able to compete in.”But Bolt is a champion who knows nothing but excellence when performing on the world stage.”Gatlin challengeBolt enters the World Championships as the defending champion in both the 100 and 200 metres following his conquests in Moscow two years ago, but with a serious challenge expected from resurgent American Justin Gatlin.This year, Gatlin has produced the better form, posting world-leading times of 9.74 seconds in the 100 metres in Doha back in May and 19.57 seconds in the 200 metres at the US Trials in Oregon the following month.Bolt’s 100 metres best this year has been a 9.87 clocking under pressure in London last month.The injury issues last year and early this season have been a major problem, but Mills said a few changes to his training regime had proven productive.”We have been making a number of changes on the way he trains and have been getting results,” said Mills. “However, I would have wanted him to have had more races.”Bolt is the finest sprinter in the history of the sport. He captured the sprint double at the Beijing Olympics in 2008 and successfully defended the titles at the following Olympiad in London three years ago.He also did the double at the Berlin World Championships in 2009 and only a false start in the 100m at the 2011 edition in Daegu prevented him from completing yet another double.last_img read more

Hubert Lawrence: Sherone Simpson – comeback of the year

first_imgAwards are flying around the world in this festive season and, thankfully, some have come Jamaica’s way. Usain Bolt, Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce and young Christopher Taylor have gotten their share from sporting bodies and media organisations alike. There may well be more to come. One oft overlooked category might include sprinter Sherone Simpson. When she came back from a minor drug suspension for unintentional use of a stimulant in 2014, she was a shadow of the woman who had been a mainstay of the Jamaican team for more than a decade. Her return to prominence is the comeback of the year. An Olympic 100m finalist in 2004, Commonwealth 200m winner and world number one over 100 metres in 2006, joint Olympic silver medallist in the 100m in 2008, and repeat World Championship finalist in the 200m, Simpson has a portfolio many envy. Added to that, her speed and safe hands have made her a key member of the 4x100m unit that has become the best in the world. REGAINING COMPETITIVE FORM Asafa Powell managed to regain his usual sub-10 form late in the 2014 sprinting campaign with victory over Commonwealth champion Kemar Bailey-Cole. Simpson, however, struggled and aborted her 2014 season early. It was painful to watch. This year, with the guidance of coach Maurice Wilson, she gradually regained competitive form. Instead of the slouchy 2014 200-metre fourth place at the Jamaican National Championships, she looked more like her urgent self. A near dead heat with former MVP Club training partner Fraser-Pryce in the 200 metres at the UTech Classic heralded her progress. At this year’s Nationals, she was a strong second-place finisher in the 200 metres, and a flying fourth in a fast 100-metre final. In 2014, she logged times of 11.34 and 23.38 seconds in the 100m and 200m, respectively, at the Nationals. This year, the corresponding figures depicted a much brighter picture at 11.14 and 22.62. Her 100-metre win at the Pan-Am Games was wonderful. Seizing the moment, Simpson produced a winning time of 10.95 seconds. It was her 13th sub-11 clocking and her first since 2008. Out in the 100-metre semis in the World Championships, the 32-year-old comeback kid reached the 200m final, where she ran a season’s best time of 22.50 seconds and chipped in with a high-speed first leg to help Jamaica to reach the 4×100-metre final. CLEAN SLATE Her comeback would be perfect if the authorities would wipe her slate clean. After all, it’s been proven that the company that supplied the tainted supplement that got her and Asafa Powell in trouble was guilty of incomplete product labelling. She and Powell sued the offending company and won an out-of-court settlement. If the USA track and field association, USATF, can back Allyson Felix in her quest to run both the 200 and 400 metres at the 2016 Olympic Games, perhaps the JAAA can help our two heroes erase the blot on their reputations. That, and an individual Olympic medal next year, would make Simpson’s comeback complete. If she stays injury free, success is possible. – Hubert Lawrence was making notes at track side when Sherone Simpson ran for Manchester High School at Girls’ Championships 2002.last_img read more

McCatty: Refs to blame for basketball foul up

first_imgVeteran basketball official, Howard McCatty, has agreed with the Inter-Secondary Schools Sports Association’s (ISSA) competition’s director, George Forbes, that the referees are to blame for the incident which forced game one of the ISSA Southern Conference under-19 basketball final to be ruled null and void and ordered replayed.McCatty, a former basketball president and currently a referees’ trainer and technical commissioner, said the match officials erred by not ensuring that the teams were checked, even though others are sometimes assigned to fulfil this task.”They (referees) should have checked the identification cards before the game started. But, here in Kingston, we usually have someone checking it, and they (refs) thought it was checked by the table,” he explained.CHECKING ID’S”But I would put the blame on the referees because a technical commissioner should be at the table to check all IDs. In Northern (Conference), I check all IDs before the games starts,” he added.Calabar won game one of the series, only for Camperdown to launch a protest against their opponents for not having their IDs available for the game.However, ISSA investigations revealed that Calabar had no IDs. Camperdown did not have their full complement either and, as a result, a replay was ordered. Forbes blamed the match officials for not upholding the rules.”Our rules are quite simple, and that is you must have an ISSA-issued ID. The referees are the ones causing the problem. How do they know that a player has an ID? If I am the referee and I know you and I say you can play, that does not mean you satisfy the criteria,” Forbes said recently.McCatty admitted that sometimes schools have ID issues when they come to games, and insists that once it can be verified that a player is legitimate, they try to accommodate the schools as best as they can. However, he says next season, there will be no room for such leniency with the regulations.last_img read more

Campion cruises to title with draw

first_imgKINGSTON: Campion College are winners of the PCJ Group National Schoolgirls Chess Champion-ship, securing a 1.5-1.5 draw against Immaculate Conception High in the final round of the tournament at PCJ Auditorium, in St Andrew. Campion went into the fourth and final round on six points, needing only a draw against Immaculate to secure seven points and top honours. Despite being the superior team on paper, Campion’s Sheanel Gardner, Aulanni Kidd and Janique Lee decided not to take any chances, eventually offering draws to their less-fancied opponents on all three boards. Three teams ended on six points each, including Wolmer’s Girls ‘A’, Immaculate Conception and Excelsior High ‘A’. Wolmer’s Girls ‘A’ took home second place on a tiebreaker over Immaculate, adjudged third. Excelsior ‘A’ ended fourth. Green Island High ‘A’ and Holy Childhood High ended on four points each. However, when the tiebreaker system was employed, Green Island ‘A’ took fifth place over Holy Childhood, who had to settle for sixth position. TIEBREAKER Wolmer’s Girls ‘B’ were seventh with three points and Excelsior High ‘B’ took eighth place on a tiebreaker over Green Island ‘B’, as both teams ended on two points. The Best Rural team award went to Green Island ‘A’. Individual category prizes were awarded to Campion’s Sheanel Gardner, Aulanni Kidd and Janique Lee, who were declared Best Board One, Best Board Two and Best Reserve, respectively. The Best Board Three prize went to Alliyah Yankana of Wolmer’s Girls ‘A’. Campion’s coach, National Master Ryan Blackwood, was adjudged best coach. In closing the championship, chair of the Jamaica Chess Federation’s (JCF) women’s chess committee, Listra Clemetson, said they want to use the championship as a springboard. “The JCF’s women’s chess committee is very pleased with the revival of schoolgirls chess, and we plan to use the foundation we have laid this year to build for the future,” said Clemetson. “We are thankful to the Petroleum Corporation of Jamaica, who, over the last year and a half, has embraced the vision for the growth of the sport of chess in Jamaica at the junior level, through their support of the high schools chess championships, and we are encouraging other corporate bodies to throw their weight behind the sport,” she added.last_img read more

Tony Becca: The minnows of cricket going well

first_imgThe International Cricket Council’s (ICC) T20 World Cup got under way in style this past week with Chris Gayle of the West Indies, New Zealand, and England setting the stage for some glorious action to come. T20 cricket is known for its excitement, especially for its power-hitting and acrobatic catching, and the 2016 T20 World Cup needed no kick-start. Gayle got the proceedings under way with a scintillating and glittering innings of 100 runs off 47 deliveries with 11 towering sixes against England; New Zealand followed up by handing stinging defeats to India and Australia; and England redeemed themselves and stayed in the race with an impressive record-breaking run chase against South Africa. For Gayle, it was nothing new and, therefore, not surprising. For New Zealand, however, victory and over India and Australia, especially one behind the other, and so quickly at that, was almost surprising, and so, too, was England’s grand recovery after falling so easily to the West Indies. New Zealand first knocked off India, scoring 126 for seven, and then nailing India for 79 in 18.5 overs before taking care of Australia, first by scoring 142 for eight and then by limiting Australia to 134 for nine. The real excitement, however, came on Friday morning (local time) when South Africa raced to 229 for four after scoring 58 run off 4.2 overs before falling to England, who dashed to 230 for eight after making a rousing start of 44 off just two overs. Apart from those four interesting and exciting matches, however, the 2016 tournament belongs to the minnows. With the tournament featuring a qualifying round which saw six minnows, Affiliates and Associates members, Ireland, The Netherlands, Scotland, Afghanistan, Oman, and Hong Kong, plus two Full Members, Bangladesh and Zimbabwe, playing against each other in two groups, with the two winners going through to the Super 10 stage, the qualifiers were quite interesting and produced some fairly good, but exciting cricket. Ireland and The Netherlands, the usual upsetters in ICC tournament, were expected to do well but not to top the groups and advance in the tournament, not with the presence of Bangladesh and Zimbabwe. Bangladesh did make it to the tournament proper, but Zimbabwe did not, and with rain forcing two no-results, both Ireland and The Netherlands who lost points due to the rain, failed to go through. The surprise teams to make it to the Super 10 were Oman who after defeating Ireland with two deliveries to spare, lost easily to Bangladesh and failed to qualify, and Afghanistan, who defeated Zimbabwe in January, beat Zimbabwe and won all three qualifying matches to reach the Super 10. While the batting of the minnows was highlighted by some towering sixes, and barring a few who are exposed to first-class cricket, reminded more of the ‘curried goat’ variety, the bowling was fairly good, only lacking at times in consistency of line and length. The ground fielding also was generally good, but for lapses by Afghanistan against Sri Lanka. The catching, however, was brilliant, and four catches to remember were by one Michael Leask of Scotland to get rid of Richmond Mutumbami of Zimbabwe at long off; one by Sikander Raja of Zimbabwe at cover to remove Kyle Coetze of Scotland; one by Zeeshan Masqood of Oman at short extra-cover to take care of Paul Sterling of Scotland; and what must be the catch of the tournament so far, Gary Wilson’s effort on the square-leg boundary to remove Aamir Ali of Oman. Qualifying round FAILED TO SAVE As good as that catch was, it failed to save Ireland. For years now, ever since the coming of the World Cup and the T20World Cup tournaments, the weaker teams, the minnows, have been calling for greater opportunities, for more cricket so that they can improve their play. Despite the performances of teams like Ireland and Netherlands, however, their calls have fallen on deaf ears. As we laud the performances of Oman and Afghanistan, who have joined Ireland and The Netherlands as upsetters, we think of teams like Kenya, East Africa, Papua New Guinea, Namibia, America, and Argentina, among others, and what has happened to them. In 1969, the West Indies went to Ireland and were badly beaten, albeit in a friendly match; in 1992, the West Indies lost Kenya in the World Cup; in 2003, Sri Lanka lost to Kenya; in 2007, Pakistan lost to Ireland in the World Cup; in 2007, England lost to The Netherlands in the T20 World Cup in 2009; Ireland beat Bangladesh in 2009 in T20 World Cup; and England again lost to The Netherlands in the T20 World Cup in 2014. “I think we are as good as Zimbabwe,” said Preston Mommsen, the captain of Scotland, although he lost a close match to them this time around. William Porterfield of Ireland has always complained about the lack of opportunity, and Mommsen also lamented the fact that Scotland had only two matches against Full members recently, one against Australia in 2013 and one against England in 2014. The minnows of cricket deserve better than this. They deserve an opportunity, an opportunity to become as good as the West Indies were before they became the champions of the world in all three versions.last_img read more

Milo serves up $750,000 for prep/primary swim champs

first_imgNestle/Milo will serve up a whopping $750,000 sponsorship and other incentives at the 19th renewal of an eagerly anticipated Milo Prep/Primary Schools Swimming Championships slated for June 3- 4, at the National Aquatics Centre. The event was launched at the same venue on Wednesday. The annual championship serves as a major development meet for children not involved in club competitive swimming at the prep and primary school level, between ages four and 12. More than 200 swimmers will compete for the respective honours and prizes this year. Amateur Swimming Association of Jamaica (ASAJ) president, Handel Lamey, praised NestlÈ for its 19 years of sponsorship. “I am very very pleased that Milo has increased their sponsorship, it’s a tremendous boost to swimming in Jamaica, because it is very expensive to host a meet like this over a two-day period, so this sponsorship is very significant and we want corporate Jamaica to come on board and to really give back to the sport,” Lamey told The Gleaner. According to Lamey, he has no doubt outstanding swimmers like Zaneta Alveranga of St Hugh’s Prep who said the prayer on Wednesday, Zacharay Jackson-Blaine from Creative Kids Learning Academy who gave the vote of thanks and Christanya Shirley of Wolmer’s Prep will several records at the meet. John Sinclair delivered the meet overview yesterday, tipping the event to be one of their ‘most exciting and competitive.’ The reigning Champion Schools are Wolmer’s Prep in the boys’ category and Immaculate Preparatory for girls while Excelsior are the Champion Primary school. Director of Sports in the Ministry of Culture and Sports Florette Blackwood lauded the efforts of Nestle/Milo for being “good corporate citizens and for their stewardship in the development of the sport of swimming.” Marketing manager of Milo, Ockino Petrie, said besides their $750,000 sponsorship they are introducing a $100,000 incentive to make his company’s 19th year as sponsors a memorable one.last_img read more

High numbers for CB Group UWI 5K

first_imgIt’s two days before the highly anticipated CB Group UWI 5K and Smart Eggs Kids K and the registration has reached an all-time high.The increasing requests have forced the organisers to extend the closing date to accommodate the registrants. From all indications, the target of $20 million should be attainable, the race organisers said in a release yesterday.”We have to be brave in our efforts to support these students who are anxious to obtain a tertiary education despite their dire circumstances. They have fought all odds to make it this far, and it would be a travesty to have them not attain their degrees because of lack of funds,”said Elizabeth Buchanan-Hind, executive director, Institutional Advancement Division, the University of the West Indies.According to Buchanan-Hind, the university has been reaping the fruits of its labour with the scholarship programme, and many of the beneficiaries have graduated with honours in the medical field, law, and other vocations.Thalia Lyn, chair of the 5K event, pointed out that the continued support of corporate Jamaica and other entities is an indication of their serious intent to have an educated population that will contribute to national development. She was referring to the five-year commitment by the CB Group as the title sponsor and other companies that are on board such as the National Baking Company, Scotiabank, Port Authority, Smart Eggs, European Union, Proven Investments, Mayberry Investments, Visual Vibes Limited, Rainforest Seafoods, European Union, RJR Group of Companies, Supreme Ventures, The Gleaner Company (Media), Newstalk, Island Grill, Sun Bloc Awnings and Tents, Power 106, The Jamaica Pegasus hotel, Jamaica Producers, Dunlop Corbin, Newstalk, It’s Pixel Perfect, and Running Events.The annual fundraiser, which is again under the professional direction of Alfred Francis of Running Events Jamaica, last year attracted over 4,000 participants, and the organisers are hoping to increase this number to 5,000 on Sunday. Besides the healthy lifestyle feature of the event, which race director Francis has been advocating, there is always the fun element of entertainment and the fabulous prizes, which this year ,include phones for first-place winners.Another feature of the annual event is an award, which is presented to a Jamaican who has given outstanding and dedicated service to sports. This year, the award will be presented to Molly Rhone, who has served with distinction in the field of netball.Entry fee is J$1,000. Students with IDs will pay $500. Registration can be done both online at runningeventsja.com or at The University of the West Indies’ Sports Department.last_img read more