The Latest On Florida State’s Controversial Rumored OC Hire

first_imgWillie Taggart on the sidelines.MIAMI, FL – OCTOBER 06: Head coach Willie Taggart of the Florida State Seminoles coaching in the second half against the Miami Hurricanes at Hard Rock Stadium on October 6, 2018 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Mark Brown/Getty Images)Willie Taggart had a very tumultuous first season at Florida State. Even one year in, there is significant pressure on him to turn it around next year, and it could result in the controversial hiring of Houston offensive coordinator Kendal Briles, the son of disgraced former Baylor coach Art Briles.He coached under his father for the Bears, and was a key part of the staff during the sexual assault scandal that rocked the team.His subsequent hires at both FAU by Lane Kiffin and Houston by Major Applewhite both came under scrutiny, but both are Group of Five programs.Now, he could head to a third new program in as many years, with the rumors of his move to Florida State. Houston media has reported the move, though it is not official yet.According to the Tallahassee Democrat, Willie Taggart has told recruits during this crucial period that they will “like” the offensive hires, though there is no official Kendal Briles news.Writer Jim Henry acknowledges that “every indication” that Briles will be the move, though he remains at Houston as of now.All signs continue to point to Taggart bringing in Briles, 36, as his next offensive coordinator.Those same signs continue to suggest that Briles – currently the associate head football coach, offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach at Houston – will bring at least one assistant coach with him.If that happens, current FSU coaches – some of whom have been on the road actively recruiting – will be impacted.The early signing period begins on December 19. The ‘Noles class currently ranks No. 13 in the country.It is unclear whether Briles will make the move before that period, but with just a few days remaining, it seems like FSU will wait until after many of their recruits sign with the program to make an offensive coordinator hire official.[Tallahassee Democrat]last_img read more

Half of all health facilities in wartorn Yemen now closed medicines urgently

Day and night, dozens of kidney patients crowd the corridors of the Dialysis Centre in Hudaydah, Yemen, waiting for their sessions. Photo: WHO Yemen The long-term impact of the conflict is also having detrimental effects on the country’s food system and infrastructure.Malnutrition is on the rise with close to half-a-million children suffering from severe acute malnutrition, with one out of every two children under the age of five stunted in their growth. This is “a 200 per cent increase since 2014 – when that number was at 160,000 – raising the risk of famine,” said Christophe Boulierac, spokesperson for the UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF). UNICEF estimates that every 10 minutes, at least one child dies in Yemen as a result of preventable causes such as malnutrition, diarrhoea or respiratory tract infections.In addition to malnutrition, children face malaria and dengue fever, both of which have been on the rise in the past two months. An outbreak of cholera has been contained, Mr. Jasarevic said.WHO, UNICEF and other UN agencies and their partners are providing aid but resources are stretched. For 2017, for example, the health cluster appealed for $322 million. Pervasive malnutrition, shuttered schools jeopardize Yemen’s future generations Meanwhile, Humanitarian coordinator in Yemen, Jamie McGoldrick, denounced a raft of atrocities taking place in Yemen, including reportedly at least 1,540 children killed; 2,450 children injured; and over 1,550 children recruited to fight or to perform military related duties. Moreover, Hundreds of people have been killed in mosques, markets, funeral wakes, schools and hospitals. At least 7,719 people have been killed and 42,922 injured since 19 March 2015, the UN World Health Organization (WHO) reported, but the actual numbers are believed to be higher.“More than half of all health facilities are closed or functioning only partially,” Tarik Jasarevic, a WHO spokesperson, told journalists in Geneva. Mr. Jasarevic, who was in Yemen in February, said that at least 274 health facilities had been damaged or destroyed as a result of the conflict, and some 44 health workers either killed or injured. He noted also a shortage of medicines and specialized staff, such as surgeons, many of whom have fled the country.“For more than six months, health facilities in Yemen had received no financial support to cover operational costs and staff salaries,” the spokesperson said. As a result, health facilities such as the chemo-dialysis centre in Hudaydah, is on the brink of ceasing operations, as there was no more fuel to run the obsolete chemo-dialysis machines, Mr. Jasarevic noted. Without the facility 600 people with kidney failure would likely die. Patients in Yemen still struggle to access health services, including surgical care, due to critical shortages of specialized health staff amid a financial crisis and no operational budget for public health facilities. Photo: WHO/Sadeq Al-Wesabi “With malnutrition amongst children at an all-time high and at least two million children out of school, the conflict and its consequences is jeopardizing future generations in Yemen,” he said, explaining that more than 11 per cent of Yemen’s entire population has been forced to move from their homes in search of safety and livelihoods. One million of these people have sought to return to their areas of origin only to find destruction and lack of opportunities to re-start their lives.Stressing that no humanitarian response can meet the increasing needs that the war is causing, Mr. McGoldrick said: “The people of Yemen have suffered long enough […] Only peace can end the suffering and I continue to call on all the parties to return to the negotiating table and to make effective their responsibilities to civilians across Yemen.” AUDIO: With famine looming in Yemen, the country is “on a knife’s edge” and in desperate need of cash from international donors to avert disaster, said Jamie McGoldrick, the UN Resident Coordinator in the country. read more