Eat Beer on Your Next Hike With a ReGrained Granola Bar

first_img Save the Environment in Style: Taylor Stitch Makes New Apparel from Old Garments Long Hair for Men: Tips for Growing and Maintaining Your Style Rumpl NanoLoft Puffy Blanket is Made Entirely Out of Recycled Material The 5 Best Margarita Mixes to Stock Up On Right Now ReGrained/FacebookSix billion gallons of beer are brewed annually in the U.S. From that process, 36 billion pounds of grain are left over. Some of it goes to farms to make fertilizer, but a lot of it goes straight to the dump. What if we could turn it into food for us?ReGrained, a small company from San Francisco, is working on a way to turn that waste into food — and a delicious one at that.Founders Jordan Schwartz and Dan Kurzrock started making beer in their college dorm rooms. For every batch they made, they threw out 15 to 20 pounds of an oatmeal-like soup that is thick, hot, and unstable. At first glance, there was nothing they could easily do with it.Then they found out that some home brewers grind up the leftover grains into a flour and make things like bread. Keen to take advantage of any way that could fund their next brew, they started making and selling bread to fellow students.Not content with just a few loaves of bread each week, they wanted to take their dorm room operation to the next level. They needed something that could be made faster and in higher quantities. Granola bars fit that model well.ReGrained/Facebook ReGrained/FacebookFlash-forward to today, and their company ReGrained sells three flavors of beer-inspired bars online, at events, and in an increasing number of retailers across the U.S. Bars like Chocolate Coffee Stout, Honey Cinnamon IPA, and Blueberry Sunflower Saison are just the beginning for ReGrained. Once they’ve scaled up production, the brand will be making enough beer grain flour to partner with bigger companies to make other great snacks. And, to help brewers turn their own beer byproduct into a food-safe ingredient, ReGrained is working to patent and licence their grain-drying technology.But Schwartz and Kurzrock wanted to do more than just save the grains. One of the company’s non-negotiable values is to reduce waste in all areas — they want their wrappers to skip the garbage as well. Working with the Agricultural Research Service, part of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, they’ve developed compostable packaging. The two layers — one derived from a sustainably harvested wood fiber and the other a synthetic option that breaks down naturally — create a wrapper that will keep your food fresh but won’t sit in the landfill for centuries.Drink beer, eat good food, and save the environment. Not a bad way to spend your time. Or, in the words, of the ReGrained mantra: “Brew Good. Bake Good. Do Good.”Feature image courtesy of ReGrained/Facebook. Editors’ Recommendations Why Tea and Beer Go Well Together (and 5 Tea Beers to Try)last_img read more

WWL’s Asia-Europe RoRo Service Adds Call to Port …

first_imgzoom Wallenius Wilhelmsen Logistics (WWL), the global RoRo shipping and factory-to-dealer logistics specialist has recently completed a shipment from Asia to the Port of Tyne near Newcastle in North East England (United Kingdom). Steven Harrison, Port of Tyne Chief Operating Officer, said: “This has been introduced to meet the demands of plant and heavy equipment manufacturers who wish to move their cargo via the port.”“This brings added connectivity to the Port of Tyne with a new RoRo service to our portfolio. In addition, it shows future possibilities of WWL providing flexibility and solutions for companies wishing to trade directly from the North East to various overseas markets.”Paul Reeves, Managing Director, Wallenius Wilhelmsen Logistics UK, said: “WWL’s regular RoRo service from Asia to Europe via the Suez and Panama canals is now enhanced by a direct vessel calling to the Port of Tyne that is connected to solid inland distribution services to the entire UK market and Ireland thanks to the strong presence and service capabilities of WWL ALS, responsible for the WWL UK inland network services.”WWL brought their first shipment of construction equipment into the Port of Tyne on the vessel MV Tristan, which arrived at the Port of Tyne at 19h30 (GMT) Wednesday 16 July – having sailed over 8,000 nautical miles in a deep-sea transit taking over 30 days sailing from Japan, then Singapore, Izmir (Turkey) via the Suez canal and Zeebrugge (Belgium).This recent call by WWL to Port of Tyne was arranged due to necessary WWL customer demand. Port of Tyne is not a regular port of call for WWL, though may easily be added to the existing WWL Asia to Europe service should continued demand be realised.Press Release; July 18th, 2014last_img read more