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Cards fall late to Oroville at home

first_imgCorning >> The Cardinals Noah Miller and Oroville’s Logan Schereck pitched gems Thursday afternoon through six, but the Tigers rallied for four runs in the seventh and the Cards couldn’t match it, falling 4-1.Both pitchers faced the minimum through three. When Oroville’s Hunter Monnot reached on an error in the top of the third, Miller picked him off at first to retire the side. Colton Rogers reached on an error to lead off the fourth and Miller got him as well.Schereck didn’t falter until …last_img read more

India and South Africa: 150 years of history

first_imgIndia and South Africa’s shared historygoes back one and a half centuries.Gandhi, the young lawyer, shortly afterhis arrival in South Africa in the late19th century.(Image: Wikimedia Commons) MEDIA CONTACTS • Di SparksBehind the Scenes Communications+27 11 648 7385 or +27 73 208 8483 RELATED ARTICLES • Trade show to boost India-SA ties • India-SA trade booming • News Cafe opens in India • SA possible new BRIC memberChris ThurmanAsk most people who they think of when you say “South Africa” and “peacemaker” and the answer is most likely to be Nelson Mandela, or perhaps Desmond Tutu.Some people might even recall South Africa’s two other Nobel Peace Prize laureates, FW de Klerk and Chief Albert Luthuli. But few will come up with the name of Mahatma Gandhi.That’s because the most famous peacemaker never to win a Nobel – although he was nominated four times – is remembered internationally more for his political protest and statesmanship in India, the land of his birth and death.It is often forgotten that Gandhi spent 20 years in South Africa. These were mutually formative years during which he developed his philosophy of satyagraha, or non-violent resistance, in response to the racial oppression he encountered here. During this time his presence in the country shaped a tradition of opposition to racism that Madiba himself would later adopt.Of course, the young Mandela – a firebrand, an angry young man with good reason to support a military struggle against apartheid South Africa – was very different from the reconciliatory figure who emerged from prison to become president in 1994.Likewise, the young Mohandas Gandhi, who arrived in South Africa in 1893, newly qualified as a lawyer after studying in London, would change over the course of time into the iconic Mahatma: a barefoot mystic, wearing only a dhoti, or loincloth, and shawl, sitting at a weaving loom and preaching to pilgrims.It has been argued that Gandhi’s early political pronouncements expose him as an elitist who endorsed notions of racial hierarchy and segregation. It was only through his experiences of the South African or Anglo-Boer wars at the turn of the century, the Anglo-Zulu War of 1906, imprisonment, discrimination against all so-called non-Europeans in the South African Union, and frequent abuse by state officials, that Gandhi became disillusioned with the British Empire and its racist practices.Following his return to India in 1915, Gandhi began to campaign for Indian independence – which was finally achieved shortly before he was assassinated in 1948, although the event was marred by Muslim-Hindu violence and the partition of India and Pakistan.A significant day in India and South AfrucaAll of this means that the great man’s birthday, 2 October – a national holiday in India – is also a significant day in South Africa. In 2010 it has an additional resonance because this year marks the 150th anniversary of the arrival of Indian indentured labourers in the former colony of Natal, now known as the province of KwaZulu-Natal.Today, it is calculated that South Africa has the largest population of people of Indian descent, but born outside India, of any country in the world. Of the million plus who live here, many can trace their roots back to the labourers who were imported to work in sugar cane plantations and in mines, but historians are quick to point out that there are some variations to the story.On the one hand, some of the “Indian” labourers actually came from further afield in south-east Asia; on the other hand, there were thousands of Indians who immigrated to South Africa independent of the indenture system.Shared historyNonetheless, commemorating the 150-year mark provides an opportunity to reflect not only on historical but also current ties between the two countries. Shared History – the Indian Experience, a festival affirming these connections, has entertained audiences in Durban, Cape Town and Johannesburg during August and September. As in previous years, the festival has included a wide range of events centred on dance, music, visual art, literature and food.While the overall tone has been one of celebration, those participating in the festival have also been able to offer critiques of their respective Indian and South African societies. Where The Streets Have No Name, an exhibition of work by Indian artists curated by Alka Pande, is a response to the plight of street children – a phenomenon common to both countries.Pande and her artists worked together with children from the Salaam Baalak Trust, an organisation providing refuge to thousands of children in New Delhi and elsewhere. The result is a fascinating series of twin pieces: one by the artist alone, the other a collaborative painting to which the children contributed.One of the dominant themes in the exhibition is dreaming: it seems that art offered the children a chance to dream of a better life, to escape – if only temporarily – the deprivation that defines their worlds.In Seema Kohli’s Memories, for instance, the collaborative piece depicts families and homes – memories of happier times, perhaps, but more likely imagined – while Kohli’s own work alludes to an archetypal or cultural memory that must be recuperated if poverty is to be combated.This theme is also apparent in Mahua Sen’s Home is a Self-Portrait diptych, while Viren Tanwar presents an ironic take on the consumerism that often informs dreaming in My Dream, which is dominated by brand names and the illusory appeal of bright lights in the big city.The desire to escape is poignantly manifested in the frequent invocation of airplanes and birds, as well as in the repetition of aerial views of city street plans: from up high, the streets aren’t nearly as dirty and dangerous. Nelly Meignie-Huber’s Kids Who Have No Name” is a sobering re-working of the exhibition’s title, emphasising the difficulties that these children face in creating an autonomous identity for themselves.Despite its social inequities, India, like South Africa, remains a richly diverse country, and the Shared History festival was a reminder of its complex heritage. There was a particular focus on the south-western state of Kerala and its dance forms and food, but there were also Indian authors and artists whose presence attested to the country’s multilingualism and multiculturalism. The electronica produced by Delhi-based duo The Midivil Punditz, for instance, fuses international pop music trends with Indian classical and folk styles.In a different vein altogether, poet and translator Arvind Krishna Mehrotra, who was part of a delegation of Indian writers in conversation with South African writers under the banner of Words on Water, spoke about the “cycles of linguistic give and take” through which Indian languages and literature have developed: Hindi and Portuguese, Tamil and Arabic, English, Sanskrit. “Writers,” he says, “tend to resist the limitations of national or regional categories.”This affirmation of international exchange as a vital component of both individual and collective cultural identity is at the heart of the Shared History programme – and, as we mark the annual anniversary of Gandhi’s birth along with the 150-year anniversary of the mass arrival of Indians in South Africa, it is a principle that should be affirmed again and again.ilast_img read more

Soil is more valuable than gold

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest In terms of civilization, it is more valuable than gold. The soil is the foundation for food and stability required for organized, structured society. Without good, productive soils, everything else starts to erode away. The loss of productive soil is a sad tale that shows up over and over throughout the history of mankind.This repeated trend throughout the earth’s millennia of agriculture intrigued David Montgomery, a geologist at the University of Washington in Seattle, who spoke at the Conservation Tillage and Technology Conference in March.“As a geologist I started looking at soils and studied erosion around the world. A decade ago I got really interested in how soil erosion affected ancient civilizations. That culminated in a book that looked at the role of soil degradation in the decline of ancient civilizations. There is a depressing component to that because you see the same story play out in society after society. Societies that degraded their land didn’t prosper in the long run. You can look at places like Syria or Libya as modern examples of places that degraded their land to the extent that it compromised their descendants greatly in terms of their prosperity and stability,” Montgomery said. “Then my wife and I bought a house in north Seattle that came with a yard with dirt — not much in the way of soil. It had an old growth Seattle lawn with six inches of tangled roots. We pulled that lawn off to make a garden and we didn’t find a single worm. It was dead dirt. We embarked on an attempt to bring life back to the soil to make a garden.”In the small-scale urban backyard project, Montgomery and his wife had surprising success in rebuilding their soil with the addition or organic matter, increasing biological diversity and minimizing soil disturbance.“We restored the soil really fast, much faster than I would have guessed from the research I had done on ancient civilizations. Nature takes a long time to make an inch of soil, but we can do it much faster by taking advantage of our ability to bring organic matter in to enhance what nature would take a long time to do. We wrote a book about that experience and the parallels between what microbial activity does in the soil to help plants and what happens in the human gut. They are kind of like the same system. Then I was left wondering if we could do that same thing on a global scale on farms around the world,” Montgomery said. “I took some time off of teaching at the University of Washington in Seattle to visit farmers around the world who had already restored fertility to their land. I brought a shovel with me and said, ‘What’d you do? What did you start with and what do you have now? Can we dig a hole here and at your neighbor’s place?’ I was really impressed how rapidly some farmers had been able to restore fertility to their land and how much they had been able to reduce their use of fertilizers and pesticides. No-till was a sort of foundation for re-building soil health.”The crucial role of reducing and eliminating tillage initially surprised Montgomery.“What do you think of in terms of icons for agriculture? The plow. It is on the seal of the USDA — Thomas Jefferson’s plow is still there. Societies throughout history have relied on it. The idea that plowing could degrade soil over the long run is a little counter intuitive but it is pretty solid in terms of causing soil erosion. If you till the soil you are leaving it vulnerable to the wind and the rain until the next plant comes up. If you do that for generations it can really add up,” Montgomery said. “I found three simple principles that were in common among the farmers who had reversed the trend of ancient soil degradation and rebuilt the fertility of the land. The principles are: ditch the plow, cover up with cover crops, and grow a diversity of crops, whether in the cash crops or cover crops. Some of the farmers I visited with were growing corn, soybeans and wheat and adding diversity with cover crops in between. They had all greatly reduced fertilizers and pesticides while maintaining yields, which increases farmer profits. I view rebuilding soil health as the best long-term investment a farmer can make but it can also pencil out over the short run too. We are starting to learn about the role of soil life bacteria and fungi in plants and crops. They can help rebuild soil health at a pace that, as a geologist I find quite fast.”Montgomery’s first popular book, “Dirt,” was a fairly grim look at how erosion undermined ancient civilizations around the world. The follow up “Growing a Revolution: Bringing Our Soil Back to Life,” is more of a good-news environmental story. Montgomery’s most recent book, “The Hidden Half of Nature,” co-written with his wife, Anne Biklé, looks at the power of microbes in the soil and in human health. His books are available at books.wwnorton.com/books/Growing-a-Revolution/.last_img read more

Web Development Reading List #143: The Referrer Header, Third-Party Scripts, And Color Psychology

first_img Related postsInclusive Components: Book Reviews And Accessibility Resources13th December 2019Should Your Portfolio Site Be A PWA?12th December 2019Building A CSS Layout: Live Stream With Rachel Andrew10th December 2019Struggling To Get A Handle On Traffic Surges10th December 2019How To Design Profitable Sales Funnels On Mobile6th December 2019How To Build A Real-Time Multiplayer Virtual Reality Game (Part 2)5th December 2019 Web Development Reading List #143: The Referrer Header, Third-Party Scripts, And Color PsychologyYou are here: Hey! I don’t have a lot of links for you this week, but I feel that the ones that I selected are particularly useful to read. I learned about how to break Google captchas, the Referrer header, color psychology, and read an amazing new article by Maciej Cegłowski whose articles and talks I value a lot. Enjoy your weekend!The post Web Development Reading List #143: The Referrer Header, Third-Party Scripts, And Color Psychology appeared first on Smashing Magazine.From our sponsors: Web Development Reading List #143: The Referrer Header, Third-Party Scripts, And Color Psychology HomeWeb DesignWeb Development Reading List #143: The Referrer Header, Third-Party Scripts, And Color Psychology Posted on 1st July 2016Web Design FacebookshareTwittertweetGoogle+sharelast_img read more