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Sharks are bringing back icon Patrick Marleau

first_imgNASHVILLE — A Patrick Marleau reunion with the Sharks might happen, after all.Off to an 0-3 start and encountering depth issues — perhaps not unexpectedly — with their forward group, the Sharks are among a few teams that recently have reached out to Marleau’s camp, according to Pierre Lebrun of TSN and The Athletic.The Sharks had scored just scored three goals before Tuesday’s game against the Nashville Predators. They’ve lost 4-1 and 5-1 to the Vegas Golden Knights and 3-1 to the Anaheim …last_img read more

India and South Africa: 150 years of history

first_imgIndia and South Africa’s shared historygoes back one and a half centuries.Gandhi, the young lawyer, shortly afterhis arrival in South Africa in the late19th century.(Image: Wikimedia Commons) MEDIA CONTACTS • Di SparksBehind the Scenes Communications+27 11 648 7385 or +27 73 208 8483 RELATED ARTICLES • Trade show to boost India-SA ties • India-SA trade booming • News Cafe opens in India • SA possible new BRIC memberChris ThurmanAsk most people who they think of when you say “South Africa” and “peacemaker” and the answer is most likely to be Nelson Mandela, or perhaps Desmond Tutu.Some people might even recall South Africa’s two other Nobel Peace Prize laureates, FW de Klerk and Chief Albert Luthuli. But few will come up with the name of Mahatma Gandhi.That’s because the most famous peacemaker never to win a Nobel – although he was nominated four times – is remembered internationally more for his political protest and statesmanship in India, the land of his birth and death.It is often forgotten that Gandhi spent 20 years in South Africa. These were mutually formative years during which he developed his philosophy of satyagraha, or non-violent resistance, in response to the racial oppression he encountered here. During this time his presence in the country shaped a tradition of opposition to racism that Madiba himself would later adopt.Of course, the young Mandela – a firebrand, an angry young man with good reason to support a military struggle against apartheid South Africa – was very different from the reconciliatory figure who emerged from prison to become president in 1994.Likewise, the young Mohandas Gandhi, who arrived in South Africa in 1893, newly qualified as a lawyer after studying in London, would change over the course of time into the iconic Mahatma: a barefoot mystic, wearing only a dhoti, or loincloth, and shawl, sitting at a weaving loom and preaching to pilgrims.It has been argued that Gandhi’s early political pronouncements expose him as an elitist who endorsed notions of racial hierarchy and segregation. It was only through his experiences of the South African or Anglo-Boer wars at the turn of the century, the Anglo-Zulu War of 1906, imprisonment, discrimination against all so-called non-Europeans in the South African Union, and frequent abuse by state officials, that Gandhi became disillusioned with the British Empire and its racist practices.Following his return to India in 1915, Gandhi began to campaign for Indian independence – which was finally achieved shortly before he was assassinated in 1948, although the event was marred by Muslim-Hindu violence and the partition of India and Pakistan.A significant day in India and South AfrucaAll of this means that the great man’s birthday, 2 October – a national holiday in India – is also a significant day in South Africa. In 2010 it has an additional resonance because this year marks the 150th anniversary of the arrival of Indian indentured labourers in the former colony of Natal, now known as the province of KwaZulu-Natal.Today, it is calculated that South Africa has the largest population of people of Indian descent, but born outside India, of any country in the world. Of the million plus who live here, many can trace their roots back to the labourers who were imported to work in sugar cane plantations and in mines, but historians are quick to point out that there are some variations to the story.On the one hand, some of the “Indian” labourers actually came from further afield in south-east Asia; on the other hand, there were thousands of Indians who immigrated to South Africa independent of the indenture system.Shared historyNonetheless, commemorating the 150-year mark provides an opportunity to reflect not only on historical but also current ties between the two countries. Shared History – the Indian Experience, a festival affirming these connections, has entertained audiences in Durban, Cape Town and Johannesburg during August and September. As in previous years, the festival has included a wide range of events centred on dance, music, visual art, literature and food.While the overall tone has been one of celebration, those participating in the festival have also been able to offer critiques of their respective Indian and South African societies. Where The Streets Have No Name, an exhibition of work by Indian artists curated by Alka Pande, is a response to the plight of street children – a phenomenon common to both countries.Pande and her artists worked together with children from the Salaam Baalak Trust, an organisation providing refuge to thousands of children in New Delhi and elsewhere. The result is a fascinating series of twin pieces: one by the artist alone, the other a collaborative painting to which the children contributed.One of the dominant themes in the exhibition is dreaming: it seems that art offered the children a chance to dream of a better life, to escape – if only temporarily – the deprivation that defines their worlds.In Seema Kohli’s Memories, for instance, the collaborative piece depicts families and homes – memories of happier times, perhaps, but more likely imagined – while Kohli’s own work alludes to an archetypal or cultural memory that must be recuperated if poverty is to be combated.This theme is also apparent in Mahua Sen’s Home is a Self-Portrait diptych, while Viren Tanwar presents an ironic take on the consumerism that often informs dreaming in My Dream, which is dominated by brand names and the illusory appeal of bright lights in the big city.The desire to escape is poignantly manifested in the frequent invocation of airplanes and birds, as well as in the repetition of aerial views of city street plans: from up high, the streets aren’t nearly as dirty and dangerous. Nelly Meignie-Huber’s Kids Who Have No Name” is a sobering re-working of the exhibition’s title, emphasising the difficulties that these children face in creating an autonomous identity for themselves.Despite its social inequities, India, like South Africa, remains a richly diverse country, and the Shared History festival was a reminder of its complex heritage. There was a particular focus on the south-western state of Kerala and its dance forms and food, but there were also Indian authors and artists whose presence attested to the country’s multilingualism and multiculturalism. The electronica produced by Delhi-based duo The Midivil Punditz, for instance, fuses international pop music trends with Indian classical and folk styles.In a different vein altogether, poet and translator Arvind Krishna Mehrotra, who was part of a delegation of Indian writers in conversation with South African writers under the banner of Words on Water, spoke about the “cycles of linguistic give and take” through which Indian languages and literature have developed: Hindi and Portuguese, Tamil and Arabic, English, Sanskrit. “Writers,” he says, “tend to resist the limitations of national or regional categories.”This affirmation of international exchange as a vital component of both individual and collective cultural identity is at the heart of the Shared History programme – and, as we mark the annual anniversary of Gandhi’s birth along with the 150-year anniversary of the mass arrival of Indians in South Africa, it is a principle that should be affirmed again and again.ilast_img read more

See what Coffs Harbour has to offer

first_imgWhile you’re in Coffs Harbour for the X-Blades National Touch League, make sure you experience the many other activities on offer in the area. Besides sampling the beautiful Coffs Coast and several patrolled beaches, there’s plenty of exciting adventure sports from bare-knuckle action such as white-water rafting on the Nymboida River to scuba diving in the Solitary Islands Marine Park. Take a cycling trip from Dorrigo along quiet country roads surrounded by lush green countryside or check out surf-rafting at Coffs Harbour or a tandem skydive on to the beach.Find out more by clicking on the following link of Coffs Coast tourist delights and see ‘Where Memories are Made’:  http://www.visitnsw.com/destinations/north-coast/coffs-harbour-area?utm_source=eventreferral&utm_medium=banner&utm_campaign=xblades  Related LinksCoffs Harbourlast_img read more

16 days agoEx-Tottenham goalkeeper Jordan Archer training with Aston Villa

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Ex-Tottenham goalkeeper Jordan Archer training with Aston Villaby Paul Vegas16 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveFormer Tottenham goalkeeper Jordan Archer is training with Aston Villa.He is seeking a new club after departing Millwall in the summer, says the Daily Mail.Archer was released by the Lions at the end of the last campaign and would be an experienced option for a number of clubs, having clocked up more than 200 senior appearances in his career.The 26-year-old will work with Villa goalkeeping coach Neil Cutler and the ‘keepers who have not departed on international duty, Orjan Nyland and Jed Steer, as well as the rest of the squad who have remained at the club’s Bodymoor Heath training ground.Archer started his career at Tottenham but never made a senior appearance for the club. He joined Millwall permanently in 2015, following a successful loan spell, and made more than 150 appearances for the Lions. last_img read more

Eldorado Gold suspends work at Skouries project in Greece amid government dispute

first_imgVANCOUVER – Eldorado Gold Corp. is suspending work at its Skouries development project amid its ongoing dispute with the Greek governmentThe company says Greece’s Ministry of Energy and Environment has not issued the required permits for the project.Eldorado (TSX:ELD) also says the company also initiated legal action.The company says it will re-assess its investment in the Skouries project once it receives the required permits.Eldorado has been embroiled in a fight with the Greek government and accuses it of delaying key permits and licenses. In September, it threatened to suspend work at its operations in northern Greece, but backed off when it began talks with the government.Elsewhere in Greece, Eldorado says work at its Olympias project continues, while exploration drilling at its Stratoni project to extend the mine life are positive.last_img read more

SSC candidates withdraw agitation following assurance from Mamata

first_imgKolkata: The School Service Commission (SSC) candidates who had been part of a hunger strike in the city since February 28, withdrew their movement on Thursday, following the assurance of Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee who personally met them on Wednesday.Following the Chief Minister’s instruction, five SSC candidates on Thursday met a committee comprising five senior Education department officials at Bikash Bhawan and placed their 14-point charter of demands.

The Education department secretary assured them that they would get back to the candidates after going through their demands. After Thursday’s meeting, the students called off their hunger strike but said that they would again start a similar movement from the first week of June, if their demands are not met by then. SSC Chatra Yuva Adhikar Mancha secretary Insan Ali said: “We had a long discussion with senior Education department officials and submitted files carrying our 14-point agenda. The officials will come up with a decision within April 3. We have withdrawn the strike following the assurance of the Chief Minister, for whom we have the highest regard.” Banerjee had met the candidates on Mayo Road on Wednesday and urged them to end their hunger strike, assuring them that she would look into the matter. She also sought some time from the candidates. She also reminded them that the Model Code of Conduct (MCC) was already on and hence she would not be able to make any specific assurance in this regard. The Chief Minister also told them that her sympathy is with the candidates and also said that her government would try to find a solution in the first week of June, after the conclusion of the 2019 Lok Sabha elections. She clarified that nothing can be done immediately as that would violate the MCC and if anything is done in haste, it could be challenged in the court of law. Banerjee instructed state Education minister Partha Chatterjee, who was accompanying her, to include five of the agitating candidates in the expert committee headed by the Education department secretary Manish Jain, to make a comprehensive report on the issue. It may be mentioned here that Thursday was the 29th day of the hunger strike by the SSC candidates. Over 400 SSC candidates from the state had been part of the hunger strike at Mayo Road under the banner of SSC Chatra Yuva Adhikar Mancha. The candidates had accused that there have been some irregularities in the appointment of assistant teachers at state-run schools. They have called for immediate recruitment in the numerous vacancies across the state.last_img read more

Making of Mankading

first_imgThe 41.16 Law “If the non-striker is out of his/her ground from the moment the ball comes into play to the instant when the bowler would normally have been expected to release the ball, the bowler is permitted to attempt to run him/her out. Whether the attempt is successful or not, the ball shall not count as one in the over. If the bowler fails in an attempt to run out the non-striker, the umpire shall call and signal Dead ball as soon as possible.” Also Read – Puducherry on top after 8-wkt win over ChandigarhFirst Instance India’s Vinoo Mankad, after whom the rule is named, was among the earliest bowlers to run a non-striker out. On December 13, 1947, during India’s tour of Australia, Mankad had run out Bill Brown when Brown had left the crease before he delivered the ball. Since then, this tactic has been referred as ‘Mankading’.Bradman’s Reaction “An early sensation came in Australia’s innings when Brown was once more run out by Mankad, who, in the act of delivering the ball, held on to it and whipped the bails off with Brown well out of his crease. Immediately, in some quarters, Mankad’s sportsmanship was questioned. For the life of me, I cannot understand why. The laws of cricket make it quite clear that the non-striker must keep within his ground until the ball has been delivered.”There have also been situations when bowlers have decided against this particular form of dismissal. For instance, in the 1987 World Cup, West Indies fast bowler Courtney Walsh had refrained from running out Saleem Jaffar – eventually losing the game. It is definitely not a binding question of upholding spirit, rather it is a personal choice that mustn’t be unlawfully enforced.last_img read more

Trump misses tax returns deadline set for legal war

first_imgWashington: The White House has refused to meet a Tuesday deadline to deliver six years of President Donald Trump’s tax returns to Congress, escalating a battle that is expected to head to court. The House Ways and Means Committee’s chairman, Richard Neal, had given the Internal Revenue Service until April 10 to turn over the president’s personal tax returns, and those of several entities connected to Trump, for 2013 through 2018. That deadline was extended to April 23. But Trump has signaled he does not want his financial information disclosed, repeating his oft-used excuse during the 2016 presidential campaign that he would not release his tax returns while under audit by the IRS. Trump broke with a long-established norm during the 2016 elections by refusing to release the returns as most presidents have done since the 1970s even though it is not required by law. “The president is pretty clear: Once he’s out of audit, he will think about doing it,” White House Deputy Press Secretary Hogan Gidley told Fox News on Tuesday. “He’s not inclined to do so at this time.” The US Treasury Department said it was reviewing Neal’s request and consulting with the Justice Department, and that there were “serious constitutional questions” related to the request. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, in a letter to Neal, said the department would render a final decision by May 6 on whether or not to comply. But Mnuchin also warned that congressional Democrats, through the Ways and Means demand, were seeking “to obtain and expose the president’s tax returns.”last_img read more

Instagram updating contentbanning policies on app

first_imgSan Francisco: As part of its efforts to curb the spread of false information, consipiracy theories and hate on its platform, Instagram is implementing a policy change concerning the removal of posts violating content norms based on accumulated negative strikes, as well as content bans. Instagram has said that with its new policy, accounts will be removed after an undisclosed amount of violations and an undisclosed window of time. And it’ll be the same bar for every user, regardless of how often they post on the app, Engadget reported on Wednesday. Also Read – Swiggy now in 500 Indian cities, targets 100 more this year Up until now, Instagram relied on a policy that allowed “a certain percentage” of violations within a window of time before it decides to ban someone. The company said it doesn’t want to share the exact number of strikes it will put in place, or the timeframe for them, because it doesn’t want bad actors to take advantage of the system, the report added. Earlier this week, the photo-messaging app decided to run posts going viral on its app through Facebook fact-checkers to ensure the credibility of the posts. Instagram also announced that it would soon allow users to appeal posts that have been taken down, directly from inside the app.last_img read more

Cahill hoping to join the World Cup greats

first_imgAustralia’s Tim Cahill is hoping to score one more time as he looks to join Brazil legend Pele and former Germany strikers Miroslav Klose and Uwe Seeler as the only players to have found the back of the net in four World CupsDespite now being 38 years old, Cahil continues to represent Australia at international level after 14 years and 106 appearances.The forward, who played with Millwall until the end of last season, and has amassed 50 goals in his international career and has scored in three separate World Cup tournaments.Despite now approaching the age of 40, Cahill could achieve something this summer that not even Cristiano Ronaldo has accomplished yet.Neymar, BrazilNeymar targets Ronaldo’s record for Brazil Andrew Smyth – September 10, 2019 Neymar heads into Brazil’s friendly against Peru on Wednesday morning hoping to draw level or beat Ronaldo Nazario’s goal record.“Yeah, it’s amazing, insane,” Cahill told Optus Sport, via Sydney Morning Herald.“To even be mentioned with those greats as an Australian is insane.”Australia will face France in their Group C opener on Saturday.last_img read more