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MPA Redesigns Relaunches Web Site

first_imgTraffic to the site, which averages about 200,000 unique visitor sessions per month, varies according to what’s happening in the industry, says Martin. Though the resource-intensive sections, such as Advertising and PIB, tend to be perennial traffic drivers. “Currently, the fastest growing section of our site in terms of visitors is the Digital section. The digital newsstand, digital initiatives and the member blogroll are updated throughout the day,” says Martin. More social networking functionality is in the works, Martin says. As the AMC show draws near, a blog related to that show will be added. And within the next few months, a more robust community section will debut and will include a member discussion forum and expanded social networking features. Not to be outdone by b-to-b publishing’s American Business Media’s site relaunch in early 2008, the consumer magazine industry association Magazine Publishers of America relaunched its site Tuesday. Most prominent in the redesign is a new navigational format. Social media functionality is scarce for the time being. “We redesigned [the site] not only to increase online engagement with our various constituents but to also better take advantage of technological advances in the digital space,” said Nina Link, MPA’s president and CEO, in a statement. The comment reflects what Link has typically said when noting various examples of magazine publisher Web sites at MPA events. The site has ditched its top-of-page, mouse-over scheme for a left-margin navigation format. Additionally, the site now offers RSS functionality and a “community” page, which lists links to MPA groups and content on Facebook, LinkedIn and YouTube. “The redesigned site displays the content in a smarter way to meet the needs of the users,” said Debbie Martin, director of information services, in an email. “When we surveyed members and non-members during the development stage we discovered that most people visit magazine.org for research and news. So we’ve highlighted news and research. Also, the new Flip Book feature allows users to quickly see what’s topical and relevant.” last_img read more

ImageTagging Company Stipple Raises 3 Million

first_imgPublishers and marketers are using it to provide mouse-over callouts to social share tags and e-commerce capabilities as well. Whether an image is used as entertainment or as a marketing or commerce prompt, Stipple remains neutral, but its revenue is generated from the marketing and commerce-oriented initiatives. Image content is monetized in two ways, through affiliate deals where clicks on a “shop” tag are paid out, or through straight advertising campaigns that marketers initiate through enticing viewers to like a brand tagged in the image or click through to a video. Revenue shares are split 50/50, says Flemings.So far, Flemings says Stipple has 100 million tagged product images in its database. The company claims it’s tagging 1 million photos per day, with brands such as Nike, L’Oreal, Zappos and Nordstrom using the service. When a publisher uses those images on its website, the affiliate payments begin as visitors engage with the photos. And since the introduction of Twitter Cards, which allow publishers to embed rich media “cards” in their tweets, including a tweet-sized photo card, Flemings says publishers can tweet a photo instead of a static link, and Stipple’s API carries over the embedded callouts in that photo. “Photos can contain teasers, be shoppable and so on, and now all of those can be used in Twitter.” Further, Flemings notes engagement rates with Stipple-tagged images far surpass standard display ads. “The advertising model today is based on interruption,” he says. “Publishers provide their content for free and users tolerate being interrupted by an ad as part of the service. And the engagement rates with those ads continue to plummet, which is forcing marketers to be even more interruptive.”Stipple-tagged photos, Flemings counters, average 78 mouse-overs and 35 clicks per thousand—rates that translate to 7.8 percent and 3.5 percent, respectively. “Our business model is very simple,” he says. “We don’t spam people and we put accurate information in photos. We protect the social contract with people, which has allowed us to get these engagement rates.”Stipple’s latest financing came from Sands Capital. The company previously raised $5 million in the first part of its series A round and $2 million in seed capital in 2010. Other backers include Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, Floodgate, Relevance Capital and Justin Timberlake. Images are one of the most sharable formats across the web, but the data associated with those images gets lost each time they’re shared from one platform to another. Stipple, which just received $3 million in the second part of a series A round, plans to expand its service, which allows publishers, marketers and users to tag images not just with author attributions, but social and e-commerce calls to action.To get a sense of what Stipple does for images, founder Rey Flemings offers this scenario: “You pull out your cell phone and take a picture. At that moment, your phone knows where you are, the time and location and saves this information to the file. You upload the image to Facebook and does that information stay with the photograph? No.”Flemings cautions that Stipple is not a DRM solution—”We’re not a photo cop company”—but the service does do more than simply provide sticky attribution tags. last_img read more

Stephen Hawking coin revealed and its out of this world

first_img Culture “It is a great privilege to be featured on a coin, and I hope my father would be pleased to be alongside Sir Isaac Newton and Charles Darwin as scientists who have made it on to money,” Lucy Hawking said in a statement. In a video taken at the Mint, she comments on the design. “It’s a 2D surface that seems to have a 3D image on it,” Hawking notes. “It’s as though you could fall into the black hole.”Coin collector site Change Checker says Hawking will be one of only three people commemorated on a British coin within a year of dying, along with Winston Churchill and the Queen Mother.When Hawking was just 21, he was diagnosed with a form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis known as Lou Gehrig’s disease that gradually paralyzed him. He used a wheelchair and spoke through a computer system operated with his cheek.Hawking is also in the running to appear on the British 50 pound note. £50 translates to about $64 US and AU$92. Comment The Mint revealed the coin late Monday. It features Hawking’s name and an image of a black hole, with Queen Elizabeth II on the reverse side.hawkingcoincropThe Hawking coin as shown on the Royal Mint’s site. Royal Mint “Stephen Hawking made difficult subjects accessible, engaging and relatable and this is what I wanted to portray in my design,” coin designer Edwina Ellis said on the Royal Mint’s site. “I wanted to fit a big black hole on the tiny coin and wish he was still here chortling at the thought. I am sure he would have thought of ways to harness the shiny table of the coin too.”Those of us who don’t have a regular opportunity to handle British money can buy the coin online, but it’s not cheap. According to the Daily Mirror, the Mint is selling the coin for £10 ($13 US, AU$18) for a simple uncirculated version of the coin to £795 ($1,050 US, AU$1,485) for a gold version of the coin. (Or just find a British friend to get you one.)The coin’s release came two days before the one-year anniversary of Hawking’s death on March 14. The acclaimed scientist was 76 when he died in 2018.Hawking’s daughter, Lucy, and son Tim visited the Royal Mint to see the coin. Stephen Hawking Space More on Stephen Hawking Tags Share your voicecenter_img Star Trek to Simpsons, Hawking was a pop culture physicist Hawking’s ashes to rest near graves of Newton, Darwin ‘There is no God,’ Stephen Hawking writes in final book 1 The Stephen Hawking coin is pretty stunning. The Royal Mint Ever feel like your money just falls into a black hole? You might find it fitting to pick up a 50 pence coin (about 65 cents US, 95 cents Australian) honoring late British physicist Stephen Hawking. The Royal Mint began issuing the coin March 12 at 7 a.m. GMT (3 a.m. Eastern time/midnight Pacific). 9 Photos Originally published March 8.Update, March 12: Adds image of the coin and new details. Stephen Hawking’s brilliance in 9 quoteslast_img read more

Coral reefs are better at coping with rising sea temperatures than we

first_imgClose up of polyps are arrayed on a coral, waving their tentacles. There can be thousands of polyps on a single coral branch. Credit: Wikipedia Marine rainforests Known as the “rainforests of the sea,” coral reefs form some of the most diverse ecosystems on earth. Despite only covering 0.1 percent of the ocean’s surface, they provide a home for 25 percent of all maritime species, including fish, mollusks, and sponges. Coral reefs are actually deposits of calcium carbonate, the substance found in sea shells. The makeup of any coral reef is complex and consists of microscopic organisms called corals that live together in small colonies known as polyps. Polyps that contain “reef building” coral species are responsible for laying down the calcium carbonate that form the reefs. Corals live together with algae, and this relationship helps coral reefs survive. But when coral reefs experience stress, such as an increase in sea temperature, they sometimes expel the algae, which results in coral bleaching, a phenomenon in which the coral loses all its color, appearing completely white. This can result in the death of the reef. For example, in 2005, the US lost half of its coral reefs in the Caribbean to a massive bleaching event.It is already known that some corals are better than others at coping with stress. So Professor Stephen Palumbi and his colleagues at Stanford University in California set out to assess whether coral species have the ability to acclimate to warmer temperatures by increasing their thermal tolerance levels. Palumbi and his team completed their fieldwork on coral reefs in the U.S. National Park of American Samoa on Ofu Island. They concentrated on an important reef-building coral species. The corals were contained in two adjacent pools. In the first pool, water temperatures were more varied, reaching temperatures as high as 35°C. This was known as the highly variable pool. The second pool, known as the moderately variable pool, rarely experienced water temperatures of above 32°C. Coral transplant First, the researchers tested the photosynthesis rates of corals from both pools to compare how well they coped with high temperatures. They then transplanted coral colonies from the moderately variable pool to the highly variable pool to see if the coral would adapt to higher water temperatures. The transplanted corals were left to acclimate over the course of about two years, and were regularly tested for thermal tolerance over this time. The researchers conducted genetic analysis to see if there was any change in gene expression during this period that would result in higher thermal tolerance.It was found that corals in the highly variable pool were more tolerant of higher temperatures when compared to the corals in the moderately variable pool. But the most interesting finding involved the ability of the coral to acclimate to higher water temperatures. Dr Daniel Barshis, part of the team that completed the research, said: “The most important finding was that corals are capable of increasing their thermal tolerance limits substantially in just 12 to 18 months. This acclimation in upper tolerance limits correlates with changes in gene expression as well.” Real-world applications Barshis went on to say that this new knowledge should be integrated into models that predict the effects of global warming on coral reefs to help us understand how they will respond to rising sea temperatures in the future, he said: “This research provides some glimmer of hope that corals may have the ability to survive more than we’ve given them credit for, but only if we reduce the amount of current and future stresses.”This research also has many real-world applications that could help protect coral reefs from future climate change. Palumbi said, “It should be possible to use climate-resistant corals in transplant/restoration efforts in order to replant reefs with greater future resilience. This is one of the things we are doing this summer in a set of pilot projects in Samoa.” Citation: Coral reefs are better at coping with rising sea temperatures than we thought (2014, May 30) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-05-coral-reefs-coping-sea-temperatures.html Journal information: Science More information: Mechanisms of reef coral resistance to future climate change, Science 23 May 2014: Vol. 344 no. 6186 pp. 895-898. DOI: 10.1126/science.1251336ABSTRACTReef corals are highly sensitive to heat, yet populations resistant to climate change have recently been identified. To determine the mechanisms of temperature tolerance, we reciprocally transplanted corals between reef sites experiencing distinct temperature regimes and tested subsequent physiological and gene expression profiles. Local acclimatization and fixed effects, such as adaptation, contributed about equally to heat tolerance and are reflected in patterns of gene expression. In less than 2 years, acclimatization achieves the same heat tolerance that we would expect from strong natural selection over many generations for these long-lived organisms. Our results show both short-term acclimatory and longer-term adaptive acquisition of climate resistance. Adding these adaptive abilities to ecosystem models is likely to slow predictions of demise for coral reef ecosystems. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.center_img (Phys.org) —Coral reefs are under threat from rising sea temperatures caused by global warming. But in a recent paper, published in Science, it was found that certain types of coral are able to adapt to tolerate higher sea temperatures by changing the genes they express. Scientists think this new discovery could be used to devise new ways of protecting coral reefs, as well as improving our predictions of how they will cope with climate change in the future. © 2014 Phys.org Explore further Some corals adjusting to rising ocean temperatures, research sayslast_img read more